Kid Activities
1000's of Ideas for Childcare Professionals & Teachers!

Teaching Kids the Value of Money

July 23, 2009 23:26 by Barbara Shelby

 

The Jump Start Coalition for Personal Financial Literacy has found that the average high-school graduate is lacking basic money-management skills. One key to correcting this problem is to start teaching children financial literacy at a young age.

Some ideas:

First, have you opened a SAVING ACCOUNT with your child? If not, do this together. Go over monthly statements with your child so they can see how it is growning. Savings can come from portions of gifts, allowance, and earnings from odd jobs for the family and about the yard and house.

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MAKE A COFFEE CAN WISH LIST

1. Have the kids cut pictures from old magazines or draw pictures of something they want.

2. Decorate the cans with glitter, the pictures, stickers. etc.

3. Cut a slit in the plastic top of the can for the child to deposit money.

4. Each time children add money to the can, they are contributing a little bit more to the "wish" item. A great way to teach kids to save money! Be sure to tell parents the purpose/value of the can...

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READ BOOKS THAT CONTAIN MONEY IN THE THEME

Help kids learn about money in a fun way!  There are so many good "message" books from which to choose. A good book list for children ages five to thirteen is here... Reading and then discussing “message books" ” (books written with a lesson built in) is a great way to teach life lessons!

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 JAR FULL OF PENNIES

Helping others is a common theme during the holiday season. Start collecting pennies and by the end of 2010, you'll have plenty to donate. All you need is a clear plastic jar in a prominent place - so everyone (children, parents, and staff members) remember to deposit any spare pennies. )

  • To begin, gather the group to talk about the importance of giving back to others. Choose a charity together. Talk about: "How many pennies do you think the jar can hold? How much is that in dollars? How long do you think it will take us to fill the jar?"
  • Every day, everyone puts pennies into the jar. Check in with the group every week: Are we halfway there yet? How much money do you think we've collected?
  • When the jar is full, count the pennies (grouping by 10 might make it easier) and find the total in dollars. Compare estimates with the total amount collected. Then, donate!
    Source: mixinginmath.terc.edu.

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BUDGET EXPERIMENT

 

One activity, adapted from moneyandstuff.info can help children experiment with budgeting.

The children will need paper and pencils. Provide each child with a "budget" of $25 or $50. Give each child a store flier or catalog and ask each child to write down what items they would like to buy. After a few minutes, have them add up the cost of the items they've chosen.

Did they stay within their budgets? For an additional activity, have the children talk about the items they wanted to buy.

  • Are the items necessities or luxuries?
  • Explain the difference between wants and needs and see if the children's buying plans change.

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SPEND AN AFTERNOON MAKING A BANK! This just may inspire you child to fill it up--saving towards a goal--or to then visit a commercial bank and deposit the savings.

#1 PAINTED PIGGY BANKS
Turn empty Kool-Aid canisters into piggy banks that the kids design and create. Simply peel the outside label off the plastic canister. Wash the canister and dry completely. Once dry, arrange the various paints and brushes... Children can use their imagination to make an animal, face or ________? Cut a slit in the top of the canister.

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#2 CLOWN BANK
Materials: Paper towel tube, cardboard, construction paper, yarn, poster board

1. Tape or glue a round piece of cardboard to each end of a paper towel tube.
2. Cut a slot for the clown's mouth, Make it large enough for coins to go through.
3.Paint the tube white, Glue on yarn hair and features cut from the paper.

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 GIVE KIDS AN ALLOWANCE

Kids need to practice making good choices with money and they need money to do that...Getting children to save money is important. It sets them up for a life time of making good financial choices!

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Children's Books About Money

July 23, 2009 21:29 by Barbara Shelby

 

 AGES 5 AND UP
A Bargain For Frances by Russell Hoban.
HarperCollins, 1970. Frances saves and saves for a china tea set. Her friend Thelma tricks her into buying an old plastic tea set. Thelma says there are no "backsies" on the bargain. Frances finds a way to get what she really wants.

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A Quarter From The Tooth Fairy by Caren Holtzman.
Scholastic Inc.,1995. A boy tries to figure out how to spend the money he got from the tooth fairy. This book has notes in the front for adults and activities in the back for kids.

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Alexander, Who Used To Be Rich Last Sunday by Judith Viorst.
Atheneum, 1978. Alexander started the week as a rich young man. There are so many things he could do with a dollar. The money begins to slip away.

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Apple Picking Time by Michele Benoit Slawson. Crown, 1994.
All the townspeople work in the orchards at harvest time. Anna sets a goal to pick a whole basket of apples herself.

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Brothers by Florence B. Freedman. Harper and Row, 1985.
Two brothers inherit their father's land and split it evenly. Find out how they make their father's wish come true.

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How The Second Grade Got $8,205.50 To Visit The Statue Of Liberty by Nathan Zimelman.
Whitman, 1992. The second grade class finds out that earning money for a big trip is not as easy as it looks.

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Not So Fast Songololo by Niki Daly.
Atheneum, 1985. A young boy goes with his grandmother to the busy city. He helps her do her shopping. Before they leave, she gets him a nice surprise.

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Something Special For Me by Vera B. Williams.
Greenwillow Books, 1983. Rosa can't make up her mind. After a long day of shopping, she finally finds the gift she wants.

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The Gold Coin by Alma F. Ada. Atheneum, 1991.
This is a picture book based on a Spanish folk tale. Juan is a thief who wants to steal Doña Josefa's gold coin. As he travels to find her, he meets farmers and villagers who need his help with their chores. By the times he finds Doña Josefa, he has found another type of treasure. Find out what treasure Juan finds.

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The Purse by Kathy Caple. Houghton Mifflin, 1986.
Katie loves the noise her savings make in her Band-Aid box. She spends her savings on a new purse and throws away her Band-Aid box. Now she has no noise and no money.

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Tight Times by Barbara Shook Hazen.
Viking Press, 1979. David learns about "tight times" and making hard decisions.

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AGE 6 AND UP

A Chair For My Mother by Vera B. Williams.
Greenwillow Books, 1982. A family loses all their furniture in a fire. They set a goal to buy a chair for mother. Find out how the family, neighbors and friends work together for success.

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A Job For Jenny Archer by Ellen Conford.
Little, Brown, 1988. Jenny wants to buy her Mom a fur coat. She tries many ways to earn money. Instead of a coat, Jenny finds the perfect gift in a most unlikely place.

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Arthur's Pet Business by Marc Brown.
Little, Brown, 1990. Arthur wants a pet. His parents doubt he can take care of one. Arthur starts a pet business to prove his parents wrong.

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Bea And Mr. Jones by Amy Schwarz. Bradbury, 1982. Bea and her father switch places. He goes to school. She goes to work.
Ben Goes Into Business by Marilyn Hirsch.

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Holiday House, 1973. A boy in the early 1900's makes 60 cents with a 10 cent investment at Coney Island.

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Erandi's Braids by Antonio Hernández Madrigal.
G.P. Putnam's Sons (1999). Erandi's mother needs a new fishing net and also wants to buy Erandi her birthday gift, but is unable to due to their limited income. Erandi recognizes that her braids are valuable and makes a decision.

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Money on the Bookshelf Money Concepts: Decision Making, Recognizing Resources and Recognizing Success.
Jerome The Babysitter by Eileen Christelow.
Clarion, 1985. Jerome goes on his first baby-sitting job. The kids play tricks on him. Jerome is surprised when he gets them all to bed.

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Leo And Emily's Zoo by Franz Brandenberg
(1988). Leo and Emily set up their own zoo. They make people pay to get in. Things don't go well. See who helps them out.

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Money Trouble by Bill Cosby.
Illustrated by Varnette P. Honeywood. Scholastic (1998). Little Bill wants to become famous by discovering a new comet, but first he needs a telescope. The telescope he wants costs $100 and he only has $47.87 in his football bank. Little Bill finds ways to earn money through jobs. Money on the Bookshelf Concepts: Recognizing Success, Problem Solving and Goal Setting.

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My Rows and Piles of Coins by Tololwa M. Mollel.
Illustrated by E.B. Lewis. Clarion Books (1999). Saruni saves money he receives from helping his mother work in the marketplace. His goal is to save enough money to buy a bicycle, so that he can better help his mother carry food to the marketplace. He works and saves his money for a long time. Money on the Bookshelf Concepts: Savings, Goal Setting, Prioritizing and Recognizing Success.

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No Time For Christmas by Judy Delton.
Carolrhoda, 1988. Two friends get jobs to buy each other Christmas presents. One works nights and the other works days. They don't see each other anymore.

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Pedrito's Day by Luis Garay.
Illustrated by Monica Hughes. Orchard's Books (1997). Pedrito works to make money to buy a bicycle to help his mother at the marketplace. He helps his aunt with work, but makes a mistake and looses her money. He then finds a way to fix his mistake. Money on the Bookshelf Concepts: Savings, Goal Setting, Problem Solving and Recognizing Success.

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Something Good by Robert Munsch. Annick Press Ltd., 1990. Tyya tries and tries to get her father to buy "something good" at the grocery store. After some trouble, Tyya's father buys her for $29.95.

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The Cinnamon Hen's Autumn Day by Sandra Dutton.
Atheneum, 1988. Is it more fun to rake your own leaves or have Mr. Rabbit's lawn service do it for you?

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The Gift by Aliana Brodmann.
Simon and Schuster, 1993. A young girl cannot decide what to buy with her Hanukkah money. Her decision is touching and surprising.

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AGES 8 AND UP

 Chicken Sunday by Patricia Polacco.
Philomel Books, 1992. To thank old Eula for her wonderful chicken dinners, the children sell decorated eggs and buy her a beautiful Easter hat.

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The Rag Coat by Lauren A. Mills.
Little Brown, 1991. Minna proudly wears her new coat of clothing scraps to school, where the other children laugh at her until she tells them the stories behind the scraps.

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AGES 9 AND UP

All The Money In The World by Bill Brittain.
HarperCollins, 1979. A young boy's wish for all the money in the world comes true. The boy finds out that having all the money in the world isn't as fun as he thought.

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Jefferson by Mary Frances Shura. Dodd, 1984.
Jefferson's family doesn't have enough money to give him a birthday party. The neighborhood kids earn money for a party.

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Lyddie by Katherine Paterson, Lodestar Books, 1991.
In the 1840's a farm girl goes to the city to get a factory job. She works hard to earn money to pay off the debt on the family farm.

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Project Wheels by Jacqueline Turner Banks.
Houghton Mifflin, 1993. Angela and her friends raise money. They want to help a classmate buy a wheelchair. Angela begins to see that she and her friends are growing-up.

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The Adventures Of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain.
Scholastic, 1876. In the second chapter, Tom gets out of the boring job of whitewashing the fence. He finds a way to get every boy in town to do it for him.

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Tybee Trimble's Hard Times by Lila Perl.
Clarion, 1984. Tybee wants to go to the circus, but there's no extra money. Should she go alone if she earns the money for a ticket?

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AGE 10 AND UP

Blue Denim Blues by Anne W. Smith.
Atheneum, 1983. Shy Janet is good with children. She gets a job in day care. She learns about child abuse and overcomes her shyness.

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Finders, Keepers? by Elizabeth Crary.
Parenting Press, 1987. What would you do if you found something? Finders of lost goods have choices.

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First Things First by Kristi D. Holl.
Atheneum, 1986. Shelly's mom and dad can't pay for summer camp this year. Shelly spends her summer earning money. She finds out what is important to her.

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Gopher, Tanker And The Admiral by Shirley Climo. Crowell, 1984. Gopher wants to earn money to buy a bike. He decides to baby-sit for a crabby neighbor who has a broken leg. Together they solve a mystery.

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How To Get Fabulously Rich by Thomas Rockwell.
Watts, 1990. Billy wins a lot of money. Everyone he knows wants some of the money. He wonders if winning was worth it.

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Kid Power by Susan Beth Pfeffer.
Watts, 1977. Janice has a summer business doing odd jobs. She ends up with more jobs than she can handle. She hires other kids to work for her.

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Kid Power Strikes Back by Susan Beth Pfeffer.
Watts, 1984. Janice's summer business ends when school starts. She begins to miss the money she made. Find out what she does.

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Mall Mania by Betsy Haynes.
Bantam Skylark, 1991. Beth borrows a friend's credit card and goes on a shopping spree at the mall. She gets deeply into debt and must find a way out.

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Oliver Dibbs To The Rescue by Barbara Steiner.
Four Winds, 1985. Oliver and his brother think about ways to earn money. They want to use the money to help protect animals.

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The Toothpaste Millionaire by Jean Merrill.
Houghton Mifflin, 1972. Rufus makes his own toothpaste. He starts selling it and makes money. His friends help him make his business something great.

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AGE 11 AND UP

Jason And The Money Tree by Sonia Levitan.
Harcourt Brace, 1974. Jason plants a ten dollar bill. It grows into a money tree. He gets into some situations that help him learn about life.

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AGE 12 AND UP

Credit-Card Carole by Sheila Klass.
Scribner's, 1987. Carole loves to shop. She runs up a huge credit-card bill. Find out how she takes care of it.

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AGE 13 AND UP
Discovered! by Yvonne Green.
Bantam, 1988. Kelly ends up getting into the world of modeling by accident. She finds out it is not all fun.

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It happened At Cecelia's by Erika Tamar.
Atheneum, 1989. Andy's father is part-owner of a restaurant. Trouble starts when the mob tries to take over.

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Seventeen Against The Dealer by Cynthia Voigt. Atheneum, 1989. Dicey uses her money to open a boat shop. When she tries to build her own boat, she ends up in situations she never imagined.

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Shadow In The North by Philip Pullman.
Knopf, 1988. Sally's business causes a client to lose money. She tries to find out why and is drawn into a complex plot.

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Compiled by the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Books listed are available at your local bookstore, public library or at Amazon.com.

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Rain and Clouds Theme

June 2, 2009 01:50 by Barbara Shelby

 

It's Raining...It's Pouring!
The kids are having fun with the loads of ideas on this page!

Updated February 2013

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RAIN...

GUESS HOW MUCH RAIN?

Have each person mark a line on a container showing where they think the water line will be when the rain stops. The person closest to the actual line is the winner.

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MAKE A RAIN GAUGE
Materials
Popsicle stick
Ruler
Waterproof marker
Clean, empty soup can
Colorful contact paper or paintbrush, acrylic paints, and clear acrylic spray (optional)
Glue
Plastic bucket and sand (optional)

1.  Lay a Popsicle stick next to a ruler, aligning the ends.
Use a waterproof marker to copy the ruler markings onto the Popsicle stick.
2.  Mark every inch, half-inch, quarter-inch, and eighth-inch on the Popsicle stick.
3.  If you like, have children decorate a clean, empty soup can with colorful contact paper or acrylic paint.
4.  If the can is painted, finish it with clear acrylic spray.
5.  Stand the Popsicle stick inside the can and glue it onto the side of the can.
6.  Set the can outside in a place where it won't tip over. If you like, place the can in a plastic bucket and pack sand around it.
7.  After a rainfall, read the Popsicle stick ruler to see how much rain has fallen.
8.  As an extension---you can log your readings on a chart, calendar or in a weather notebook.
9.  Pour the rain out of the can after each reading.

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CAN YOU GET A LOCAL WEATHER PERSON or meteorologist to visit your class or program?
Request the weather person talk about their job and why they like it... Show children how to predict the weather using instruments, etc.
Brainstorm with children and prepare questions to ask when the guest arrives...

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WATER TASTING
1.  Provide tap water, soda water, mineral water, and distilled water.
2.  Pour the different types of water into paper cups and have children taste them.
3.  Discuss the differences.
4.  As an extension you can do a survey/graph

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YELLOW RAIN
Collect raindrops into two different containers
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1.  Use ONE container with NO COVER...
2.  Place a COVER ON THE OTHER container (A coffee filter will work fine as a cover)
3.  As the rain falls through the air, it gets dirty; this leads into an environmental talk regarding the dirtiness of air and purifying drinking water...

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FYI
HOW FAR AWAY IS THAT STORM?
The purpose of this experiment is to watch lightning and hear thunder to give you clues about how far away you are from a storm.
What you need:
One thunderstorm
A stop watch (Or the ability to say "one-Mississippi")

1. After you see a flash of lightning, count the number of seconds until you hear the thunder. (Use the stop watch or count "One-Mississippi, Two-Mississippi, Three-Mississippi," etc.)
2. For every 5 seconds the storm is one mile away. Divide the number of seconds you count by 5 to get the number of miles.

  • What travels more quickly, light or sound?
    If you said light travels faster than sound, you're right! The lightning and thunder are happening at the same time, but light reaches you instantly, while sound takes longer.
  • Do you ever see lightning without hearing thunder? Some call that "heat lightning," but it is really lightning that is over 15 miles away and too far away for you to hear the thunder!
  • LOOK OUT if you see the lightning and hear the thunder at the same time!

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ART AND MUSIC
1.  Provide gray, black, and white paint at an easel or on covered tables.
2.  Play a CD of rain sounds or tape record rain or a thunderstorm.
3.  Have the children listen to the rainstorm and paint to it.
4.  Ask the children how the tape makes them feel.
5.  This could also be done as a group mural!

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TWO RAIN STICKS
#1 (Heavy-Duty)
1. Hammer nails into Heavy cardboard mailing tubes 1/8" apart, using the spiral seam of the cardboard.
2. Add several handfuls of assorted filler material (rice, beans, etc)
3. Seal each end of the tube securely with tape.
4. Decorate your stick with raffia, ribbon, adhesive-backed shelf paper, wrapping paper or a jungle print or decorations.

RAIN STICK #2
Paper Towel Roll, Tape that can be painted, Paint, Glue, Uncooked Rice, Toothpicks...
Pre-poke holes into the side of the paper towel rolls. Have children poke toothpicks through the holes and glue each end of the tooth pick. Next- tape one end of the roll closed. Add rice and tape the other end. Then let the children paint their sticks as they choose. Last, cut off the toothpicks that stick out from the tube.

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MAKE IT RAIN! #1 (Science) 
Need:
Glass mayonnaise or canning jar, plate, hot water, ice cubes,
Pour about two inches of very hot water into the glass jar.
Cover the jar with the plate and wait a few minutes before you start the next step.
Put the ice cubes on the plate.
What happens?
The cold plate causes the moisture in the warm air, which is inside the jar to condense and form water droplets. This is the same thing that happens in the atmosphere. Warm, moist air rises and meets colder air high in the atmosphere. The water vapor condenses and forms precipitation that falls to the ground
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MAKE RAIN #2
1.  Boil some water in a pot until steam forms above it.
2.  Fill a pie pan with ice cubes and hold it above the pot in the steam "cloud."
3.  Have the children observe that when the steam comes in contact with the cool air from the pie pan, drops of water form and fall back into the pot like rain. 

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RAIN ART
Kids put on rain gear and take heavy duty paper plates outside. Sprinkle a few drops of food coloring onto plates and watch as designs appear. For a 'batik effect', first draw on the plate with white crayon and then add the food coloring.

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SIDEWALK CHALK ART
A couple hours after a rain fall...take children outside and have them draw on the sidewalk with sidewalk chalk. Colors will be bright from the rain water.

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BUILD ON A RAIN-WORD  (For older children)
1.  Choose a long word that is related to the rain (umbrella, for example) and have each player write it in the center of a piece of paper.
2.  Allow two minutes to build up as many other words as they can from the basic word. (Add to letters like in scrabble)
3.  All the new words must in some way be related to the first word.
4.  The player with the most words wins.

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'OUT IN THE RAIN' PAINTING
When the weather forecast is light rain, make a rain painting. Spread out a large sheet of paper before the rain begins, using bricks or other heavy objects to weigh down the edges. Fill shaker dispensers with powdered paint. Sprinkle the paint randomly over the paper.
As it rains, the raindrops will mix and blend the paint. After a few minutes, go out and observe the designs the rain has made for you. Bring in the wet painting, and let it dry on layers of newspaper.

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UMBRELLA PAINTING
Rainy days on the way? Have interested children bring a solid color umbrella. Cover floor, open umbrella, decorate each section with fabric paint or pens. Let dry for a day before closing or using.

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ORANGE UMBRELLA SNACKS
1.  Slice an orange into 1/4" thick round slices.
2.  Cut each round slice in half -to form a half round umbrella shape.
3.  Place each orange umbrella on a small plate.
4.  Have each child choose an "umbrella handle" from thin sliced cheese, pretzel sticks, thin celery sticks, or thin apple slices.

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TISSUE PAPER COLORED UMBRELLAS
Materials:
Sheet of white or manila oaktag (heavy paper)
Art tissue paper of various colors cut up into small pieces
Black felt tip permanent marker
Scissors
Squirt bottle of water
1.  Make umbrella shape templates and trace the shape on oaktag as large as you would like -- but no smaller than half of the sheet.
2.  Cut it out.
3.  Using the marker--- draw the umbrella ribs on the shape.
4.  In a colorful arrangement, have children place pieces of art tissue all over the oaktag.
5.  Carefully and gently squirt the "papered umbrella" with the water---as a RAIN SHOWER.
6.  Lay it flat to to dry. As the tissue dries --- the colors will adhere to the oaktag.
7.  While drying,trace and cut out a handle-- which can be stapled to the dry umbrella.
8.  The tissue will fall off when dry.

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UMBRELLA PICTURES #1
Need: Cupcake liners, Scissors, Glue, Crayons or Paint Pipe Cleaners
1.   Cut several Cupcake liners in half (these will be umbrellas).
2.  Glue the umbrellas onto a sheet of paper. Use pipe cleaner to make the umbrella handles---Glue on the handles. Add clouds and rain drops.
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UMBRELLAS #2
1.  Have the children cut individual egg-carton cups in half.
2.  Have them glue the halves onto a sheet of construction paper.
3.  Add pipe cleaners for handles.
4.  Draw pictures around the umbrellas with crayons or paint.

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Let it rain...SQUIRT ART!
Materials:
Blue colored water
White construction paper or-butcher paper
#1 IDEA: Cover the area and let children squirt blue colored water on white construction paper.
Or-
#2 IDEA: Hang a large piece of butcher paper on the fence of the play yard and let children squirt blue colored water on the butcher paper.( It'll look like rain)

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WRITE AND ILLUSTRATE RAINY DAY POEMS
Write poems about puddles, mud, raindrops, or gray skies...

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WILL IT FLOAT? Science...
1.  Gather twigs, leaves, seeds, from the playground.
2.  Throw into the air to see which will “float” on the breeze.
3.  AFTER A RAIN... gather items and toss into a mud puddle to see which will float.

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  • Instead of "Duck, Duck, Goose"...
    PLAY "DRIP, DRIP, DROP'!
  • Instead of "Simon Says"...
    PLAY THE "WEATHERMAN SAYS"!

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RAIN GAME
1.  The group sits in a circle.
2.  The leader starts by rubbing their hands together. The person to the right does the same, the person to the right, and so on until everyone is doing the action.
3.  When all are rubing their hands, the leader starts a new sound, finger snapping, then hand clapping, next slapping thighs, try foot stomping.
4.  To END the storm, reverse the actions. At the end, the group, one by one stops rubbing hands and sits and waits for action to be completed by the group.

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HAVE A RAIN DROP RACE

Each person picks a raindrop as they hit the top of the window. Follow your raindrop until it gets to the bottom of the window and see whose raindrop wins the race. Then start at the top and do it again!

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***Idea: There are "JOKES ABOUT WEATHER" in the "JOKE Category"

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WEATHER STATION DRAMATIC PLAY
Provide materials for the dramatic play area in which the children are able to be weather anchors!
Some suggestions include:

  • Large cardboard box to be used as a large televsion
  • Laminated weather-symbols for the “weather person” to explain the weather (use double backed tape or roll tape sticky side out so the symbols will stick to the weather map)
  • Large wall map 
  • Microphone (Or use paper towel tube to create one)
  • Paper and pencils to write scripts
  • 'Computer' to show the radar screen (Provide paper and let the children draw their own picture of the Doppler radar picture)

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Place WEATHER RELATED BOOKS in the Science and Literacy centers. 
A list of  books is in Spring Seasonal, Holidays, Earth & Weather Category. 

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MAKE A RAIN BOOK (For young children)
1.  Staple together 4-6 pieces of paper to make a booklet for each child. Write the words "Rain Helps Things Grow" on the cover of each book.
2.  Have children look through magazines and tear out pictures of things that need rain to help them grow such as trees and flowers---Then have them glue the pictures into their books.

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For Young Children:
Tape record and identify different sounds/kinds of rain... drizzling, sprinkling, pouring, misting, raining, thundering, lightening, hail, etc.

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RAIN POEMS/SONGS/FINGER PLAY...for young children
Sing/Say and Finger Play or Act out poems
...After children learn the poems consider having them choose one and illustrate it.

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IT'S RAINING, IT'S P0URING...
Author Unknown
It's raining, it's pouring;
The old man is snoring.
He went to bed and he
Bumped his head
And he couldn't get up in the morning.
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IT AIN'T GONNA RAIN...
It ain't gonna rain no more, no more
It ain't gonna rain no more,
How in the heck will we wash the neck
If it ain't gonna rain no more?
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RAIN, RAIN, GO AWAY...
Rain, rain, go away
Come again some other day
We want to go outside and play--
Come again some other day

Optional lyrics:
Change third line to say:
"child's name" and "child's friend's name"...
want to play.
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RAINDROPS - sung to "Frere Jacques"
Raindrops falling,
Raindrops falling,
From the sky,
From the sky.
Put up an umbrella,
Put up an umbrella,
Nice and dry,
Nice and dry.

Showers over,
Showers over,
Sun aglow,
Sun aglow.
See the pretty flowers,
See the pretty flowers,
In a row,
In a row.
By Jean Warren from Totline
Magazine, April 1993
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R-A-I-N-Y - sung to "Bingo"
There was a time when we got wet
And rainy was the weather.
R-A-I-N-Y, R-A-I-N-Y, R-A-I-N-Y
And rainy was the weather!
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EENSY-WEENSY-SPIDER
The eency-weency spider
Went up the water spout. (Move hands up while touching index finger and thumb alternately)
Down came the rain (Move hands down while wiggling fingers)
And washed the spider out. (Cross arms)
Out came the sun (Make a circle with arms above head)
And dried up all the rain.
And the eency-weency spider
Went up the spout again. (Start spider moving up again)
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WHAT'S THE WEATHER?
To Tune of Clementine

What's the weather? What's the weather?
What's the weather like today?
Tell me children what's the weather?
What's the weather like today?

Is it sunny, is it rainy, is it windy out today?
Tell me children what's the weather, what's the weather like today?

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OH MY, WHAT WILL THE WEATHER BE?
(Tune: Oh Dear, What Can The Matter Be?)
Oh my, what will the weather be?
Oh my, what will the weather be?
Oh my, what will the weather be?
It will be (rainy, cloudy, sunny, snowy, windy) today

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CLOUD IDEAS

 

A FUN BOOK IDEA:
"CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS"...

Read the book aloud to the children. Ask the children to list what they wish would rain from the sky. Record the children's responses. Have the children draw a picture of their favorite food raining down from the sky. This could be made into a class book.

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RAINY DAY CLOUD HANGINGS
1.  Make CLOUDS on gray paper & cut them out.
2.  Make RAINDROPS on blue paper and attach them to the clouds with string/yarn--- so the raindrops are falling from the cloud.
3.  Punch a hole in the cloud and tie a string to attach to then ceiling---or leave as is--to put up on wall.

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CLOUD BEAN BAG TOSS
Create raindrop shaped bean bags. Paint white clouds on cardboard or a sheet. Cut holes for the bean bag toss. Let children toss “raindrops” into the clouds.

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CLOUD PLAY DOUGH
Ingredients:
1 c. vegetable oil
6 cups flour
1 cup water
Food coloring (optional)
1.  Add food coloring to the water.
2.  Put flour and oil into large bowl.
3.  Slowly add water, stirring as you pour.
4.  Continue mixing ingredients until there is a soft dough.
5.  Add a little more water or flour if necessary.
6.  Put the dough on the table and knead until it is completely blended. This dough will have an oily texture.

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 WIND MAZE SCIENCE
1.  Create a wind table by taping blocks around the edge of a table. Use more blocks to form a maze inside the frame created.
2.  Provide a selection of materials for the children to try to blow through the maze; provide straws for the children to blow through.
3.  Some suggestions would be feathers, cotton balls, ribbons, tissue paper, marbles, ping pong balls.
4.  Brainstorm with the children what other items they could try to blow through the maze

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CLOUD ART
1.  Choose a day with white cumulus clouds in the sky.
2.  Read a book about shapes in the clouds. (Book suggestions: Little Cloud by Eric Carle;  Charles Shaw's It Looked Like Spilt Milk (HarperCollins, 1947)
3.  Provide blankets (to lay on outside), clip boards, blue construction paper, white construction paper, cotton balls, glue, scissors. children to look at the clouds and represent what they see with the art materials.
4.  Later, talk about what they saw in the clouds. Did they see a clown, angel, etc. like the book?
6.  When your next rainy day arrives--contrast "these clouds" to the other clouds...

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CLOUDS COLLAGE 
Materials needed:
Umbrella shapes cut out, gray cloud cut outs (Or cotton balls)
Blue rice (use food coloring to make blue rice)
Glue
Construction paper
Have a children MAKE A COLLAGE with blue rice and cutouts...

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COTTON CLOUDS
Materials:
Paper
Paint
Glitter,
Cotton BallS  
1.  Have children draw and paint an umbrella or a picture of themselves on paper.
2.  Next have children glue cotton for the clouds.
3.  Dip fingers into paint to make rain drops under their clouds.
4.  Sprinkle glitter on the raindrops to make them sparkle …. It will make a 3-D effect.

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COTTON BALL CLOUDS #2

Have children take a large blue piece of construction paper and draw, color, paint a landscape or seasonal scene. Glue on clumps of white fluffy cotton balls to create cotton clouds in any shape they want. Add a bright shining sun in the sky!

Looking for a 'Rainbow Theme'? Click here! Lots of ideas!

Also, check out the QUICK 102 Rainy Day~Any Day Ideas ...

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